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edens-blog:

beben-eleben:

Jim Dingilian proves that a creative and skillful artist can create works of art with just about anything. By coating the interior of empty glass bottles with black smoke and then carefully brushing it away with tools mounted on dowels, he creates detailed and beautiful but dark works of smoke art that are dripping with a sense of suburban decay (via Bored Panda).

are you shitting me

(via ruckawriter)

" Well it seemed revelatory at the time. "

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(Source: princusbeau, via snowce)

I’m trying to figure if the after-credit scene in Guardians of the Galaxy was meant to be a message that the next movie will be a painful Disney cornfest, or a promise that Marvel characters will soon all inhabit the Magic Kingdom.

Either way, it was annoying.

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Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. I only just heard the sad, sad news of Robin Williams’s death. My wife sent me a message to tell me he had died, and, when I asked her what he died from, she told me something that nobody in the news seems to be talking about.

When people die from cancer, their cause of death can be various horrible things – seizure, stroke, pneumonia – and when someone dies after battling cancer, and people ask “How did they die?”, you never hear anyone say “pulmonary embolism”, the answer is always “cancer”. A Pulmonary Embolism can be the final cause of death with some cancers, but when a friend of mine died from cancer, he died from cancer. That was it. And when I asked my wife what Robin Williams died from, she, very wisely, replied “Depression”.

The word “suicide” gives many people the impression that “it was his own decision,” or “he chose to die, whereas most people with cancer fight to live.” And, because Depression is still such a misunderstood condition, you can hardly blame people for not really understanding. Just a quick search on Twitter will show how many people have little sympathy for those who commit suicide…

But, just as a Pulmonary Embolism is a fatal symptom of cancer, suicide is a fatal symptom of Depression. Depression is an illness, not a choice of lifestyle. You can’t just “cheer up” with depression, just as you can’t choose not to have cancer. When someone commits suicide as a result of Depression, they die from Depression – an illness that kills millions each year. It is hard to know exactly how many people actually die from Depression each year because the figures and statistics only seem to show how many people die from “suicide” each year (and you don’t necessarily have to suffer Depression to commit suicide, it’s usually just implied). But considering that one person commits suicide every 14 minutes in the US alone, we clearly need to do more to battle this illness, and the stigmas that continue to surround it. Perhaps Depression might lose some its “it was his own fault” stigma, if we start focussing on the illness, rather than the symptom. Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. He died from Depression*. It wasn’t his choice to suffer that.

"

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Tom Clempsom (via mollyfamous)

FINALLY PEOPLE ARE STARTING TO TALK ABOUT WHAT DEPRESSION REALLY IS.

(via amayonce)

(via miwrighting)

truthdogg:

Don’t be distracted by slanderous stories of light fingers.

Whether true or not, it doesn’t justify shooting kids in the street.

Note who says it does however, remember exactly who simply doesn’t believe in following our system of justice, and who argues for death as righteous punishment for walking in the street or taking candy. Those people have a hatred against humanity, against due process, and against this country.

Remember them.

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The people in charge of a large American community are systematically shredding the United States Constitution tonight. It is nothing less than a police coup.

The Bill of Rights guarantees that all citizens have the right to assemble peacefully. And yet residents of Ferguson who gathered to protest under the bright August sun were met with a mid-sized Army of militarized cops, ordered off the public right-of-way, and ordered to go home, under the glare of a rifle mounted on a tripod. In a move that even George Orwell would not have believed, cops with loudspeakers insisted to the crowd, “You have the right to peacefully assemble - from 25 feet away.”

The Bill of Rights guarantees freedom of speech — but over these successive nights citizens who’ve tried to speak out of have had tear gas fired at them (in at least one case at a private citizen on his own lawn), then rubber bullets, as well as wooden pellets fired from guns.

The Bill of Rights protects the right of a free press — but apparently not in Ferguson, Mo., not tonight. Reporters from the Huffington Post and the Washington Post were arrested by cops inside a McDonald’s (!) as they were trying to file their reports; the Post’s Wesley Lowery, an African-American, was slammed into a soda fountain. They were eventually released (one small step for mankind) and when Lowery was asked, is he was more scared of the protesters or the cops, he answered: “Easy answer, i’m a black man – the police.” Other reporters, including two who happened to be black, said they were denied access to a news conference. Trymaine Lee, the former Daily News intern who went on to become a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, said on Twitter: “I’ve been told to disperse and go to my residence…”

America’s political traditions insist that the public has a right to know what its government is doing. This, too, has been ripped into a thousand pieces in Ferguson, Mo. The name of the officer who shot Mike Brown has been shielded from the public, and so have most basic facts of what occurred last weekend. A report from the medical examiner was censored to keep the public from even knowing how many times Brown was shot. What is Ferguson covering up?

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journolist:

Michael Brown remembered as a ‘gentle giant’ (St. Louis Post- Dispatch)

Michael Brown posted a haunting message on Facebook last week as he prepared to enter a new phase in his life: college. “if i leave this earth today,” he wrote to a friend, “atleast youll know i care about others more then i cared about my damn self.”

Dozens arrested during protests over Ferguson police shooting (Al Jazeera America)

At least 50 were arrested in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, according to police and local media, after a second night of protests over the death of an unarmed African-American teenager shot to death by a police officer.

Police use tear gas in Ferguson, people jam church for moment of silence (St. Louis Post- Dispatch)

Tension stayed high and raw Monday as the St. Louis region waited for answers in the fatal shooting of an unarmed teenager by a municipal police officer.

Police use tear gas on crowd in Ferguson, Mo., protesting teen’s death (Washington Post)

For a third night, summer rage pitted the people of Ferguson against those sworn to protect them. On Saturday, officers shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown. On Sunday, resident protests turned to riots, marked by looting and the burning of several local stores.

Michael Brown Shooting: Tear Gas Fired at Crowd in Ferguson (NBC News)

Fifteen arrests were made. St. Louis city alderman Antonio French posted a series of videos and pictures on Twitter documenting the police response. Young people were seen holding their hands up in the same manner that some witnesses have suggested Brown was at the time of the shooting.

Tensions in Ferguson remain ‘high and raw’ (MSNBC)

“I saw the barrel of the gun pointed at my friend,” said Dorian Johnson, 22. “Then I saw the fire come out of the barrel.” He added that “what began as an order by a police officer to ‘get the f— onto the sidewalk’ quickly escalated into a physical altercation and then, gunfire.”

FBI Investigating Ferguson Police Shooting of Teen Michael Brown (NBC News)

The FBI is opening an investigation into the shooting of unarmed Missouri teenager Mike Brown by a police officer in suburban St. Louis, officials said on Monday.

Eyewitness to Michael Brown shooting recounts his friend’s death (MSNBC)

The last moments of Michael Brown’s life were filled with shock, fear and terror, says a witness who stood just feet away as a police officer shot and killed the unarmed teen. “I saw the barrel of the gun pointed at my friend,” said Dorian Johnson, 22. “Then I saw the fire come out of the barrel.”

In defense of black rage: Michael Brown, police and the American dream (Salon)

The people of Ferguson are angry. Outraged. The officer’s story is dubious. Any black kid with sense knows it is futile to reach into an officer’s vehicle and take his gun. That story is only plausible to people who believe that black people are animals, that black men go looking for cops to pick fights with. Absurdity. Eyewitness accounts like these make far more sense.

This Is Why We’re Mad About the Shooting of Mike Brown (Jezebel)

As a black person in America, it’s getting exhausting to still have to explain, in the year 2014, your right to exist in this country. To explain that you are a human being whose value sits no lower than anyone else’s. To explain our basic humanity. And perhaps worst of all, to explain exactly why we are outraged.

#IfTheyGunnedMeDown Shows How Black People Are Portrayed in Mainstream Media (The Root)

The vicious slaying of Mike Brown by Ferguson, Mo., police has once again shown that the narrative the media paints surrounding black people in America more often than not includes depicting us as violent thugs with gang and drug affiliations. It’s safe to say that Brown has become a victim of what I like to refer to as the “Trayvon Martin effect” in the media.

Michael Brown’s Death Didn’t Happen in a Vacuum (ColorLines)

Residents of Ferguson, Missouri, the black St. Louis suburb where Brown lived and died, confronted police officers on Sunday in a scene that’s since been described by the national media as one that quickly devolved into “looting.” In photos, black residents stood in front of police with their hands up to show that they were unarmed. They chanted the slogans we’ve all become too used to over the years: “What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!”

When Parenting Feels Like a Fool’s Errand: On the Death of Michael Brown. (Stacia Brown)

Did they say, “Kill the police?!” As long as that’s the way you heard it, they did. And that is what AP will wire out to every mainstream news outlet who can be bothered to report the death of another unarmed black son on a Saturday night. Their truth is not our truth.

When police departments don’t look like the cities they’re meant to protect (Washington Post)

The St. Louis suburb of Ferguson where the working-class, majority-black population has been clashing with law enforcement for the last three days has 53 commissioned police officers. According to the city’s police chief, three of them are black.

When We Are Young (Crunk Feminist Collective)

When we are young, often too young to fully understand the anxiety in their voices and the fear in their eyes, many of us listen to our parents tell us how to behave when, not if, we are stopped by the police.

Black Kids Don’t Have to Be College-Bound for Their Deaths to Be Tragic (The Root)

Missouri teen Michael Brown was unarmed when police gunned him down. We don’t need to keep talking about his college plans to communicate that his killing was dead wrong.

Michael Brown and Anti-Black Violence (The Feminist Wire)

Black life matters. Yet the police and their media support team have already begun to execute their standard playbook in the aftermath of yet another slain black youth.

National Moment of Silence Will Remember Victims of Police Brutality (Feminist Majority Foundation)

This Thursday, a National Moment of Silence will be held in cities across the country to remember the lives lost and impacted by police brutality. In the wake of two deadly police-involved shootings in less than a week, online activist Feminista Jones and individual Twitter followers were able to coordinate the event in a single day.

National Moment of Silence #NMOS14

How social media helped facilitate a national moment of silence to honor victims of police brutality, show solidarity with their families, and allow communities to come together in a moment of mourning and support.

(via realworldnews)

dainsaint:

When you hear about the depressed comedian, think also of the lonely writer; the frightened soldier; the tortured genius. The people so afraid of what is inside them they do everything in their power to keep us from experiencing it. The people who do their best to “be the change they want to see in the world.”

Fight for them like they fight for you.

(via othemts)

(Source: nuttyproff, via politicalpolitics)

boy48:

From the film World’s Greatest Dad. RIP Robin Williams.

(via waltzfordeborah)

sesamestreet:

We mourn the loss of our friend Robin Williams, who always made us laugh and smile.

This is what depression can do, even to someone who always made us laugh and smile. It’s terrifyingly sad.

(via thingspeopleasklibrarians)