jron

Oct 18

[video]

Oct 17

(Source: the-promised-wlan, via sixtensason)

(Source: formfreu.de, via sixtensason)

Oct 16

[video]

sesamestreet:

The problem with Wookie Cookies.

sesamestreet:

The problem with Wookie Cookies.

Oct 15

miranda-meeks:

Playing around with making gifs - should I do more like this?


Yes.

miranda-meeks:

Playing around with making gifs - should I do more like this?

Yes.

(via hicockalorum)

guardian:

Fan Ho is one of Asia’s most beloved street photographers, capturing the spirit of Hong Kong in the 1950s and 60s. His work shows a love of people combined with unexpected, geometric constructions and a sense of drama heightened by use of smoke and light. More
Approaching Shadow, 1954. Photo: Fan Ho/AO Vertical Art Space

guardian:

Fan Ho is one of Asia’s most beloved street photographers, capturing the spirit of Hong Kong in the 1950s and 60s. His work shows a love of people combined with unexpected, geometric constructions and a sense of drama heightened by use of smoke and light. More

Approaching Shadow, 1954. Photo: Fan Ho/AO Vertical Art Space

(via flavorpill)

[video]

Oct 14

(Source: 500px.com, via cerebrospinalien)

“I don’t know what happened to the Future. It’s as if we lost our ability, or our will, to envision anything beyond the next hundred years or so, as if we lacked the fundamental faith that there will in fact be any future at all beyond that not-too- distant date. Or maybe we stopped talking about the Future around the time that, with its microchips and its twenty-four-hour news cycles, it arrived.” —

Michael Chabon, The Omega Glory

Futurelessness is an attribute of the postnormal era. We are confronted with so much fog — from a cascade of ambiguities, the dissolution of institutions and the collapse of solidarity, and the growing complexities of an incestuously interconnected world — that we are blocked from envisioning some extrapolated arc of history over the event horizon. And there is so much appearing and smacking us in the face everyday, it’s as if the present has been colonized by the future. As William S. Burroughs put it, 

When you cut into the present the future leaks out.

(via stoweboyd)

(via emergentfutures)

Oct 13

coolretronics:

Magicube.


I had to think for a bit to remember what these were.

coolretronics:

Magicube.

I had to think for a bit to remember what these were.

(Source: quadrafonica, via mudwerks)

mpdrolet:

James Pearson-Howes

mpdrolet:

James Pearson-Howes

poliscrutiny101:

Today’s the day! It’s another national holiday, commemorating Italian explorer Christopher Columbus, who is most-often credited with “discovering” the New World. Some people choose not to celebrate this landmark (I’m looking at you, Hawaii, Alaska, and South Dakota), but the Día de la Raza is widely recognized throughout the Americas (north and south).In some countries, today is known as the Día del Respeto a la Diversidad Cultural (Day of Respect for Cultural Diversity), which is odd, given its history. When Columbus first made landfall after his voyage, he writes “I took some of the natives by force in order that they […] might give me information.” Columbus had been guaranteed ten percent of whatever bounty he could capture by the Spanish crown, so the “parrots and balls of cotton and spears and many other things” that the locals brought out to trade just wasn’t going cut it. He took some prisoners aboard his ship to try to force them to tell him where he could find the gold he was certain they were hiding (some natives wore small bits of gold as earrings).If you’ve never read Howard Zinn’s “A People’s History of the United States,” you really should. No, really. You’d learn that when Columbus couldn’t find the gold he had promised the queen, he pushed on to Cuba, Haiti and the Dominican Republic - and took more prisoners as slaves. When he returned to Spain, Columbus told tall tales of fields of gold (and multitudes of slave labor), telling his benefactors he had found a new route to Asia. It was the cartographer Amerigo Vespucci that finally figured out that Columbus was wrong - and so we get our name from him, not Chris. But I digress.Columbus had “discovered” a new cargo he could harvest from the New World, and returned with seventeen ships the next time around - writing “Let us in the name of the Holy Trinity go on sending all the slaves that can be sold.” Those that weren’t captured as slaves, were forced to search for gold. If they failed to meet their quota, the natives “had their hands cut off and bled to death.” Now before you start to think that Columbus was some sort of slave-trading monster (he was), you should also know that he believed he was - to borrow a phrase from The Blues Brothers - ‘on a mission from God.’ He wrote “Thus the eternal God, our Lord, gives victory to those who follow His way over apparent impossibilities.” There’s a modern day political analogy here, but if we start down that road, it’ll be TL;DR before you know it. His religious fervor, perhaps, explains why the first military fort established in the New World was called “Navidad.” Merry Christmas, everybody!Christopher Columbus was rather choosy in the beginning; after capturing fifteen hundred men, women, and children, he selected only “the five hundred best specimens” (of which only 300 survived the voyage back to Spain). This went on for years and years - and yes, the locals began to fight back, killing everyone at Fort Navidad. But they were outmatched by the armor-plated, sword-wielding soldiers, and so it became commonplace for the natives to kill their own children, to spare them a life in bondage. Mass suicides also become commonplace among the Arawak people. What Columbus began, continued on the plantations established on what we call Haiti today. And by the time the Spaniards celebrated the sesquicentennial of Columbus’s “discovery of the New World” (from 1492-1650) - every man, woman and child of the original Arawak tribe (approximately a half million souls) were dead. Happy Columbus Day! I hear there’s a big sale on flat-screen TVs today.You’re welcome. 
Via  Tom Joad on Facebook give them a LIKE.

poliscrutiny101:

Today’s the day! It’s another national holiday, commemorating Italian explorer Christopher Columbus, who is most-often credited with “discovering” the New World. Some people choose not to celebrate this landmark (I’m looking at you, Hawaii, Alaska, and South Dakota), but the Día de la Raza is widely recognized throughout the Americas (north and south).

In some countries, today is known as the Día del Respeto a la Diversidad Cultural (Day of Respect for Cultural Diversity), which is odd, given its history. When Columbus first made landfall after his voyage, he writes “I took some of the natives by force in order that they […] might give me information.” 

Columbus had been guaranteed ten percent of whatever bounty he could capture by the Spanish crown, so the “parrots and balls of cotton and spears and many other things” that the locals brought out to trade just wasn’t going cut it. He took some prisoners aboard his ship to try to force them to tell him where he could find the gold he was certain they were hiding (some natives wore small bits of gold as earrings).

If you’ve never read Howard Zinn’s “A People’s History of the United States,” you really should. No, really. You’d learn that when Columbus couldn’t find the gold he had promised the queen, he pushed on to Cuba, Haiti and the Dominican Republic - and took more prisoners as slaves. 

When he returned to Spain, Columbus told tall tales of fields of gold (and multitudes of slave labor), telling his benefactors he had found a new route to Asia. It was the cartographer Amerigo Vespucci that finally figured out that Columbus was wrong - and so we get our name from him, not Chris. But I digress.

Columbus had “discovered” a new cargo he could harvest from the New World, and returned with seventeen ships the next time around - writing “Let us in the name of the Holy Trinity go on sending all the slaves that can be sold.” Those that weren’t captured as slaves, were forced to search for gold. If they failed to meet their quota, the natives “had their hands cut off and bled to death.” 

Now before you start to think that Columbus was some sort of slave-trading monster (he was), you should also know that he believed he was - to borrow a phrase from The Blues Brothers - ‘on a mission from God.’ He wrote “Thus the eternal God, our Lord, gives victory to those who follow His way over apparent impossibilities.” There’s a modern day political analogy here, but if we start down that road, it’ll be TL;DR before you know it. His religious fervor, perhaps, explains why the first military fort established in the New World was called “Navidad.” Merry Christmas, everybody!

Christopher Columbus was rather choosy in the beginning; after capturing fifteen hundred men, women, and children, he selected only “the five hundred best specimens” (of which only 300 survived the voyage back to Spain). 

This went on for years and years - and yes, the locals began to fight back, killing everyone at Fort Navidad. But they were outmatched by the armor-plated, sword-wielding soldiers, and so it became commonplace for the natives to kill their own children, to spare them a life in bondage. Mass suicides also become commonplace among the Arawak people. 

What Columbus began, continued on the plantations established on what we call Haiti today. And by the time the Spaniards celebrated the sesquicentennial of Columbus’s “discovery of the New World” (from 1492-1650) - every man, woman and child of the original Arawak tribe (approximately a half million souls) were dead. Happy Columbus Day! I hear there’s a big sale on flat-screen TVs today.

You’re welcome.

Via  Tom Joad on Facebook give them a LIKE.

(via eviltessmacher)

Oct 12

4gifs:

[video]

4gifs:

[video]

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

(Source: emmahay, via spookypebble)